The mythologies of faculty productivity: Implications for institutional policy and decision making

TitleThe mythologies of faculty productivity: Implications for institutional policy and decision making
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2002
AuthorsFairweather, J
JournalThe Journal of Higher Education
Volume73
Start Page26
Pagination26-58
Date PublishedJanuary/February
KeywordsCollege teachers, educational productivity, ratings, reform adoption, SIRS, workload
AbstractA principal belief embedded in promotion and tenure and in annual review decisions is that faculty members should and can be simultaneously productive in teaching and research. This article uses national survey data to estimate by discipline and type of institution the percentage of the faculty who meet this standard.The purpose of this article is to examine empirically the principal beliefsabout faculty work to inform the debate about how to increase facultyproductivity, enhance the attention paid to teaching, and preservethe parts of academic life essential to carry out the multiple missions ofteaching, research, and service. I examine two research questions:Research Question 1: What percentage of the faculty are productive in teachingor research?Research Question 2: What percentage of the faculty are simultaneously productivein both teaching and research?
URLDOI: 10.1353/jhe.2002.0006
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